2013’s TOP 10 MOST SIGNIFICANT DEATHS

Below find the counterpart to the previously published list of the top ten most significant deaths of 2013 in sports and entertainment.  It covers those who died this year in the fields of politics, science, journalism, and business. As with the first list, please feel free to note any omissions, disagreement as to order or disproportionate number of women that focused on sex and relationships.

#10 EDWARD I. KOCH 

The charismatic, controversially and outspoken politician led NYC out of its darkest depths when elected as its Mayor in 1977. (The same year the City launched the now ubiquitous, “I Love New York” campaign.) Leaving the City only to serve in Europe during WWII and Washington, DC as a member of Congress, Koch was the consummate New Yorker. He was 88.

The charismatic, controversially and outspoken politician led NYC out of its darkest depths when elected as its Mayor in 1977. (The same year the City launched the now ubiquitous, “I Love New York” campaign.) Leaving the City only to serve in Europe during WWII and Washington, DC as a member of Congress, Koch was the consummate New Yorker. He was 88.

# 9 DAVID FROST 

Name another British Journalist with as much impact upon U.S. politics and culture as the Cambridge educated David Frost? (Sorry Piers). Using his satiric That Was the Week That Was roots, Frost transitioned to U.S. television in the late 60’s creating a niche for intimate interviews with the rich and famous. A series of five interviews wherein former US President Richard Nixon discussed for the first time his role in the Watergate scandal catapulted Frost to the upper level of celebrity.  Rejected by the networks because the deal paid Nixon $600,000 plus profit sharing, Frost created a new broadcast method by syndicating the interviews with local stations throughout the world. Frost died at the age of 74.

Name another British Journalist with as much impact upon U.S. politics and culture as the Cambridge educated David Frost? (Sorry Piers). Using his satiric That Was the Week That Was roots, Frost transitioned to U.S. television in the late 60’s creating a niche for intimate interviews with the rich and famous. A series of five interviews wherein former US President Richard Nixon discussed for the first time his role in the Watergate scandal catapulted Frost to the upper level of celebrity. Rejected by the networks because the deal paid Nixon $600,000 plus profit sharing, Frost created a new broadcast method by syndicating the interviews with local stations throughout the world. Frost died at the age of 74. 

#8 MURIEL SIEBERT 

Shattered Wall Street’s steel reinforced glass ceiling on December 28th, 1967 when she became the first woman to own her own seat on the New York Stock Exchange, despite vigorous opposition. A self -made, college dropout, Muriel successfully managed the 1977 banking crises when appointed as New York State’s Superintendent of Banks. A great proponent of financial literacy for women and children, Muriel was 80.

Shattered Wall Street’s steel reinforced glass ceiling on December 28th, 1967 when she became the first woman to own her own seat on the New York Stock Exchange, despite vigorous opposition. A self -made, college dropout, Muriel successfully managed the 1977 banking crises when appointed as New York State’s Superintendent of Banks. A great proponent of financial literacy for women and children, Muriel was 80.

 

 

   #7 VIRGINIA E. JOHNSON

Partially responsible for putting glass on people’s ceilings. Like Siebert, did not complete college but succeeded beyond her wildest imagination. With research partner and eventual 4th husband Dr. William Masters, published in 1966 the trailblazing and controversially best seller, Human Sexual Response. Based on 8-years of recorded and measured laboratory observations, the book defined sex as quantifiable, pleasurable and possible without guilt or fear. Whether they furthered the sexual revolution or merely caught its wave, Masters & Johnson, became synonymous with understanding sexual behavior and therapy. Virginia divorced Bill in 1992 after 21 years of marriage and died at age 88.

Partially responsible for putting glass on people’s ceilings. Like Siebert, did not complete college but succeeded beyond her wildest imagination. With research partner and eventual 4th husband Dr. William Masters, published in 1966 the trailblazing and controversially best seller, Human Sexual Response. Based on 8-years of recorded and measured laboratory observations, the book defined sex as quantifiable, pleasurable and possible without guilt or fear. Whether they furthered the sexual revolution or merely caught its wave, Masters & Johnson, became synonymous with understanding sexual behavior and therapy. Virginia divorced Bill in 1992 after 21 years of marriage and died at age 88. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 #6 VO NGUYEN GIAP 

 Vietnamese General secured his place in history as one of the  20th century's most notable military commanders by defeating the French in 1954 and the United Sates in 1973. Learned technics of guerrilla warfare in campaign to rid Vietnam of the Japanese during WWII. The General lived until age 102 as perhaps the most revered Vietnamese figure next to Ho Chi Minh.

Vietnamese General secured his place in history as one of the 20th century’s most notable military commanders by defeating the French in 1954 and the United Sates in 1973. Learned technics of guerrilla warfare in campaign to rid Vietnam of the Japanese during WWII. The General lived until age 102 as perhaps the most revered Vietnamese figure next to Ho Chi Minh. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            #5 JOYCE BROTHERS

Long before Oprah got people to, “open up,” or Dr. Phil sought out Britney for an, “on air intervention,” Brothers dished out psychological advice via mass media.  Her victorious TV appearance in 1955 on The 64,000 Question, followed by a sports gig, led NBC to offer her an afternoon TV show in which she advised on love, marriage, sex and child-rearing. With radio, a Good Housekeeping column and eventual, taboo, late-night shows, as well as numerous appearances as herself in movies and sitcoms, Brothers earned the title, “the mother of media psychology.”  Brothers was 85.

Long before Oprah got people to, “open up,” or Dr. Phil sought out Britney for an, “on air intervention,” Brothers dished out psychological advice via mass media. Her victorious TV appearance in 1955 on The 64,000 Question, followed by a sports gig, led NBC to offer her an afternoon TV show in which she advised on love, marriage, sex and child-rearing. With radio, a Good Housekeeping column and eventual, taboo, late-night shows, as well as numerous appearances as herself in movies and sitcoms, Brothers earned the title, “the mother of media psychology.” Brothers was 85. 

#4 PAULINE PHILLIPS

Dear Abby… Using the pen name Abigail Van Buren, Pauline became America’s go to advice guru with her most widely-syndicated newspaper column and 110 million worldwide readers. Sister of Ann Landers who died in 2002, Pauline developed a wry style of responding to people’s most intimate problems that nonetheless put the public at ease. She was 94.

Dear Abby… Using the pen name Abigail Van Buren, Pauline became America’s go to advice guru with her most widely-syndicated newspaper column and 110 million worldwide readers. Sister of Ann Landers who died in 2002, Pauline developed a wry style of responding to people’s most intimate problems that nonetheless put the public at ease. She was 94.

 

 

 #3 MARGARET  THATCHER   

Thatcher must have been one tough woman for the Soviets to nickname her the “Iron Lady.”  Britain’s first female Prime Minister was elected an unprecedented 3 times, serving from 1979 until her resignation as Conservative Party leader in 1990.  Thatcher never flinched as she pursued divisive, conservative policies of monetarism, privatization, and self-help.  British arts, cinema and particularly punk music exploded under Thatcherism as artists and others revolted against her policies. Close with Ronald Reagan and savior of the Britain’s Falkland Islands, Thatcher lived until age 87.

Thatcher must have been one tough woman for the Soviets to nickname her the “Iron Lady.” Britain’s first female Prime Minister was elected an unprecedented 3 times, serving from 1979 until her resignation as Conservative Party leader in 1990. Thatcher never flinched as she pursued divisive, conservative policies of monetarism, privatization, and self-help. British arts, cinema and particularly punk music exploded under Thatcherism as artists and others revolted against her policies. Close with Ronald Reagan and savior of  Britain’s Falkland Islands, Thatcher lived until age 87.

 

 

 

 

 

 

#2 C. EVERETT KOOP 

Pediatric surgeon turned public health advocate was probably the United States’ most famous and influential Surgeon General, serving from 1982 to 1989 under Reagan and Bush 41.  Broke the Republican Party’s blockade in addressing the AIDS crisis by publicly emphasizing that the disease posed risks to everyone, not just gay men, and by operating within the shadows of a recalcitrant Republican party leaders whom exacerbating the impact of the disease.  His 1986 report on the dangers of secondhand smoke ultimately led to the prohibition of smoking on airplanes, restaurants and in the workplace as well as FDA regulation of tobacco.  The good doctor was 96.

Pediatric surgeon turned public health advocate was probably the United States’ most famous and influential Surgeon General, serving from 1982 to 1989 under Reagan and Bush 41. Broke the Republican Party’s blockade in addressing the AIDS crisis by publicly emphasizing that the disease posed risks to everyone, not just gay men, and by operating within the shadows of a recalcitrant Republican party leaders whom exacerbating the impact of the disease. His 1986 report on the dangers of secondhand smoke ultimately led to the prohibition of smoking on airplanes, restaurants and in the workplace as well as FDA regulation of tobacco. The good doctor was 96.

 

 

 

 

 #1 NELSON MANDELA

Transformational and historical figure inspired millions.  Died at age 95.

Transformational and historical figure inspired millions. Died at age 95.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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